The Horse

SEP 2018

The Horse:Your Guide To Equine Health Care provides monthly equine health care information to horse owners, breeders, veterinarians, barn/farm managers, trainer/riding instructors, and others involved in the hands-on care of the horse.

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6 TheHorse.com THE HORSE September 2018 Learn about the American Association of Equine Practitioners' recommended core and risk-based horse vaccines in this handy special report. Sponsored by Neogen, makers of BotVax B. TheHorse.com/137994. Eric Swinebroad, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, gives an overview of potential clinical signs of this tick-borne infection. TheHorse.com/159166. Do you have a plan in place to evacuate your horses in case of fire or other emer- gency? Dr. Rebecca Gimenez of Techni- cal Large Animal Emergency Rescue and Alayne Blickle of Horses for Clean Water tell you how to get started. TheHorse.com/159543. WHAT'S ONLINE Why Does My Horse Chew Wood? Watch: A Matter of Life and Death CURRENTLY on Equine nutritionist Clair Thunes, PhD, offers advice to keep horses from chewing on barn wood and fence posts. TheHorse. com/19560. Send your nutrition questions to THEditorialStaff@TheHorse.com. Sponsored by LMF Feeds. Stacy Anderson, DVM, MVSc, PhD, Dipl. ACVS- LA, of Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, presents her research on equine neutrophil apoptosis (programmed cell death) in inflammatory conditions. TheHorse.com/UKLectures. Listen: Creating an Equine Evacuation Plan Download: Equine Vaccination Cheat Sheet Listen: Lyme Disease Clinical Signs Podcast THE HORSE STAFF ISTOCK.COM Read: 10 Tips for Administering Oral Medications When it comes to getting necessary meds into horses, even the shortest pony can turn into an equine version of a giraffe. Here are tips to make it easier. Sponsored by Neogen, makers of Uniprim. TheHorse.com/138080. ■ HORSE HEALTH This award-winning e-newsletter offers news on diseases, veterinary research, and health events, along with in-depth articles on common equine health conditions. Supported by Zoetis . ■ HORSE WELFARE AND INDUSTRY Get the latest news on equine welfare, industry happenings, and horse-related business. E-NEWSLETTERS Get Horse Health News Delivered To You! ■ SPECIALTY WEEKLY E-NEWSLETTERS ■ Nutrition ■ Soundness & Lameness ■ Reader Favorites MONTHLY E-NEWSLETTERS ■ Behavior ■ Breeding ■ Farm & Barn ■ Older Horse Care ■ Sports Medicine This download may be reprinted and distributed in this exact form for educational purposes only in print. It may not be used for commercial purposes in print or electronically or republished on a website, forum, or blog. For more horse health information on this and other topics visit www.TheHorse.com . Published by The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care, © Copyright 2018 The Horse Media Group. Contact editorial@TheHorse.com . Va c c i n a t i n g Y o u r H o r s e PAG E 1 O F 2 e reason we vaccinate our horses is simple: We want to minimize their risk of contracting a life-threatening and/or infectious disease. Vaccination, however, is not an exact science and should be tailored to each horse's individual situation. Use this American Association of Equine Practitioners' Vaccination Guidelines -based "cheat sheet" and work with your veterinarian to devise an immunization pro gram that 's right for your horse. Core VaCCines Veterinarians recommend nearly all horses receive the core equine vaccines: tetanus, Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis (EEE/WEE), West Nile virus (WNV), and rabies. W h a t H o r s e s N e e d I t ? H o w M a n y T i m e s a Ye a r ? S p e c i a l C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Tetanus All horses Once annually, after an initial two-dose series at a four- to six-week interval. Revaccinate horses that sustain a wound or undergo surgery six or more months after their previous tetanus booster at the time of injury or surgery. eee/Wee All horses At least once annually, after an initial two-dose series at a four- to six-week interval. Vaccinate high-risk horses in areas with year-round vectors (e.g., mosquitoes) twice yearly. WnV All horses At least once annually, after an initial two-dose series at a four- to six-week interval. Vaccinate high-risk horses in areas with year-round vectors (e.g., mosquitoes) twice yearly. rabies All horses Once annually. A nne m. ebe RHARdt Special Report S P O n S O R e d b Y Thursday, Sept. 13 ❙ 8 p.m. EDT Equine Biosecurity Find out how to protect your horses from infectious disease and do your part to prevent outbreaks. Sponsored by Neogen. ASK THE HORSE LIVE! Visit TheHorse.com/ AskTheHorseLive 1 Creating and properly maintain- ing arena and racetrack footing is important not only for equine injury prevention but also for rider safety. In recent years it's been a growing research focus for scientists around the world. One of those researchers, Mick Peterson, PhD, is the director of the University of Kentucky (UK) Ag Equine Programs, a faculty member within UK's Biosystems and Agricul- tural Engineering Department, and ex- ecutive director of the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory (RSTL). The RSTL, founded by Peterson and Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD, DSc, FRCVS, Dipl. ACVS, a professor at Colorado State University's College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, has a more than 10-year his- tory of examining surfaces at race- tracks and equestrian sports venues worldwide, developing protocols and standards, and offering recommenda- tions. Peterson is considered one of the world's premiere experts in testing of high-level competition surfaces. Regardless of whether the RSTL team is working on a track (dirt, turf, or synthetic) or arena, its objective of surface testing remains the same. Here, we'll focus on racetrack surface testing; a later article will address arenas. "The goal (of surface testing) is to create a consistent surface and to meet the needs of the event," Peterson said. Ensuring racetrack surfaces meet the established criteria is fairly straightforward, he said. One param- eter the surface testing team can use to determine if the surface is doing its job well is race times for a particular day. However, it is critical on those occasions when a horse is injured and/ or safety questions arise that complete data is available to ensure the safest possible surface is provided for racing. Testing track surfaces involves examining its composition, as well as how the footing performs during use. Once investigators perform these tests, they can make recommendations for improvement, whether it be the foot- ing's contents or how it's maintained. Surface testing isn't a one-time event; rather, its a regular part of track maintenance. Part of their goal is to ensure proper long-term surface maintenance. The Maintenance Qual- ity System (MQS), which Peterson and the RSTL developed, involves a methodical approach of assessing and maintaining the surface prior to every event; it also assists track maintenance workers in enhancing the maintenance protocols already in place. This is the fi rst in a series of articles looking at the testing and maintenance of equine competition surfaces worldwide. N o matter the discipline—be it a horse race, show jumping competition, dressage test, reining pattern, or any other equine events that take place every year—all have one singular requirement they need to take place: appropriate and safe footing. In is Issue Feeding Healthy Senior Horses 02 Cold Spells Stress Livestock 05 Dr. Uneeda Bryant Recognized 07 Mineral of the Month: Zinc 10 Engineers inspect tracks prior to a race meet or before a change in season, depending on how long the venue operates each year, to ensure it is fully prepared for a safe competition. ANNE M. EBERHARDT/THE HORSE CA.UKY.EDU/EQUINE ❙ THEHORSE.COM ❙ JANUARY 2018 B R O U G H T T O Y O U B Y PART ONE: AN INTRODUCTION TO SURFACE TESTING Surface Testing: Keeping Horse and Rider Safety in Mind ■ Bluegrass Equine Digest is published monthly in partnership with UK Ag Equine and the Gluck Equine Research Center and is supported by Zoetis . This download may be reprinted and distributed in this exact form for educational purposes only in print or electronically. It may not be used for commercial purposes in print or electronically or republished on a website, forum, or blog. For more horse health information on this and other topics visit www.TheHorse.com . Published by The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care, © Copyright 2016 The Horse Media Group. Contact editorial@TheHorse.com . 1 0 T i p s f o r G i v i n g H o r s e s O r a l M e d i c a t i o n s Horses aren't always the best patients. And, when it comes to getting necessary medications into their mouths, even the shortest pony can turn into an equine version of a giraff e. Still others will eat around medications, leaving a pill-powder pile at the bottom of their troughs. Delivering oral medications often requires experimentation to see what works for each individual. Here are some tips to help you out. Special Report S P O N S O R E D B Y 1 Powder-form medications are easy to pour over a horse's feed ration, and many come fl avored to make them more appetizing to horses. Some horses will eat these without much fuss, while others need more persuasion. 2 If using pills rather than powders, you might need to crush them fi rst. Use a clean mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder dedicated to medications. Note that some coated pills should not be crushed—consult your veterinarian for instructions. 3 Is your horse not convinced? Try adding a liquid, such as water, apple juice, or molasses, to make a mash in which to mix the medication. Caution: Avoid adding sugary substances when medicating horses with meta- bolic issues, such as equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) or insulin resistance. For example, if your horse is suff ering an EMS-related laminitic epi- sode, don't use sugar to administer medications. 4 Experiment by adding some of your horse's favorite treats, such as alfalfa pellets, beet pulp, and/or car- rot or apple slices, to the mix. 5 While one horse might fi nd his medica- tion-laced ration unappealing, a compan- ion might be happy to clean up all the treats and goodies in his bucket, along with his medication dose. Make sure to feed the horse by himself. 6 Some horses can cleverly eat around the medication in their feed buckets. Check their bucket to make sure they haven't left any of their dose behind. PAG E 1 O F 2 MICHELLE ANDERSON ISTOCK.COM PHOTOS THE HORSE STAFF Powdered and flavored medications can be top dressed and mixed into a horse's regular feed ration.

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